Гилберт Честертон: различия между версиями

ОтСОРТИРовал
[непроверенная версия][непроверенная версия]
(ОтСОРТИРовал)
(ОтСОРТИРовал)
 
=== Наполеон Ноттингхилльский (1904) ===
{{Q|Цитата = — Тот человек опаснее всех,— заметил старик, не шелохнувшись,— у кого на уме одно, и только одно. Я и сам был когда-то опасен.|Комментарий = |Автор = |Оригинал = "Every man is dangerous," said the old man, without moving, "who cares only for one thing. I was once dangerous myself."}}
 
{{Q|Цитата = Род людской, а к нему относится немалая толика моих читателей, от века привержен детским играм и вовек не оставит их, сердись не сердись те немногие, кому почему-либо удалось повзрослеть.|Комментарий = [//wikilivres.ru/Наполеон_Ноттингхилльский_(Честертон)/Книга_1/Глава_1 Книга 1, Глава 1]|Автор = |Оригинал = THE human race, to which so many of my readers belong, has been playing at children's games from the beginning, and will probably do it till the end, which is a nuisance for the few people who grow up.}}
 
{{Q|Цитата = Сам по себе всякий человек с виду существо, пожалуй что, и разумное: и ест, и спит, и планы строит. А взять человечество? Оно изменчивое и загадочное, привередливое и очаровательное. Словом, люди — большей частью мужчины, но Человек есть женщина.|Комментарий = |Автор = |Оригинал = Individually, men may present a more or less rational appearance, eating, sleeping, and scheming. But humanity as a whole is changeful, mystical, fickle, delightful. Men are men, but Man is a woman.}}
 
{{Q|Цитата = Ведь куда как ясно, что нет возможности разрушить порядок вещей, опрокинуть верования и переменить обычаи, если не иметь за душой иной веры, надежной и обнадеженной свыше.|Комментарий = [//wikilivres.ru/Наполеон_Ноттингхилльский_(Честертон)/Книга_1/Глава_2 Книга 1, Глава 2]|Автор = |Оригинал = For it stands to common sense that you cannot upset all existing things, customs, and compromises, unless you believe in something outside them, something positive and divine.}}
 
{{Q|Цитата = А в Книге Жизни, на одной из ее темных, нечитанных страниц значится такой закон: гляди и гляди себе девятьсот девяносто девятижды, но бойся тысячного раза: не дай Бог увидишь впервые.|Комментарий = |Автор = |Оригинал = Now, there is a law written in the darkest of the Books of Life, and it is this: If you look at a thing nine hundred and ninety-nine times, you are perfectly safe; if you look at it the thousandth time, you are in frightful danger of seeing it for the first time.}}
{{Q|Цитата = Ведь куда как ясно, что нет возможности разрушить порядок вещей, опрокинуть верования и переменить обычаи, если не иметь за душой иной веры, надежной и обнадеженной свыше.|Комментарий = [//wikilivres.ru/Наполеон_Ноттингхилльский_(Честертон)/Книга_1/Глава_2 Книга 1, Глава 2]|Автор = |Оригинал = For it stands to common sense that you cannot upset all existing things, customs, and compromises, unless you believe in something outside them, something positive and divine.}}
 
{{Q|Цитата = Вы, кажется, полагаете, что забавнее всего чинно держаться на улицах и на торжественных обедах, а у себя дома, возле камина (вы правы — камин мне по средствам) смешить гостей до упаду. Но так все и делают. Возьмите любого — на людях серьезен, а на дому — [[юмор]]ист. Чувство юмора подсказывает мне, что надо бы наоборот, что надо быть шутом на людях и степенным на дому.|Комментарий = |Автор = |Оригинал = You appear to think that it would be amusing to be dignified in the banquet hall and in the street, and at my own fireside (I could procure a fireside) to keep the company in a roar. But that is what every one does. Every one is grave in public, and funny in private. My sense of humour suggests the reversal of this; it suggests that one should be funny in public, and solemn in private.}}
{{Q|Цитата = Он уяснил то, что всем романтикам давно известно: что приключения случаются не в солнечные дни, а во дни серые. Напряги монотонную струну до отказа, и она порвется так звучно, будто зазвучала песня.|Комментарий = |Автор = |Оригинал = He discovered the fact that all romantics know...that adventures happen on dull days, and not on sunny ones. When the chord of monotony is stretched most tight, then it breaks with a sound like song.}}
{{Q|Цитата = Если поверить вашим богатым друзьям, будто ни Бога, ни богов нет, будто над нами пустые небеса, так за что же тогда драться, как не за то место на земле, где человек сперва побывал в Эдеме детства, а потом — совсем недолго — в райских кущах первой любви? Если нет более ни храмов, ни Священного писания, то что же и свято, кроме собственной юности?|Комментарий = [//wikilivres.ru/Наполеон_Ноттингхилльский_(Честертон)/Книга_2/Глава_3 Книга 2, Глава 3]|Автор = |Оригинал = If, as your rich friends say, there are no gods, and the skies are dark above us, what should a man fight for, but the place where he had the Eden of childhood and the short heaven of first love? If no temples and no scriptures are sacred, what is sacred if a man's own youth is not sacred?}}
 
{{Q|Цитата = Еще мальчишкой Адам Уэйн проникся к убогим улочкам Ноттинг-Хилла тем же древним благоговением, каким были проникнуты жители Афин или Иерусалима. Он изведал тайну этого чувства, тайну, из-за которой так странно звучат на наш слух старинные народные песни. Он знал, что истинного патриотизма куда больше в скорбных и заунывных песнях, чем в победных маршах. Он знал, что половина обаяния народных исторических песен — в именах собственных. И знал, наконец, главнейшую психическую особенность патриотизма, такую же непременную, как стыдливость, отличающую всех влюбленных: знал, что патриот никогда, ни при каких обстоятельствах не хвастает огромностью своей страны, но ни за что не упустит случая похвастать тем, какая она маленькая.|Комментарий = |Автор = |Оригинал = Adam Wayne, as a boy, had for his dull streets in Notting Hill the ultimate and ancient sentiment that went out to Athens or Jerusalem. He knew the secret of the passion, those secrets which make real old national songs sound so strange to our civilization. He knew that real patriotism tends to sing about sorrows and forlorn hopes much more than about victory. He knew that in proper names themselves is half the poetry of all national poems. Above all, he knew the supreme psychological fact about patriotism, as certain in connection with it as that a fine shame comes to all lovers, the fact that the patriot never under any circumstances boasts of the largeness of his country, but always, and of necessity, boasts of the smallness of it.}}
{{Q|Цитата = Интеллекта у него было хоть отбавляй; наделенный таким интеллектом человек высоко поднимается по должностной лестнице и медленно сходит в гроб, окруженный почестями, никого ни единожды не просветив и даже не позабавив.|Комментарий = |Автор = |Оригинал = He had a great amount of intellectual capacity, of that peculiar kind which raises a man from throne to throne and lets him die loaded with honours without having either amused or enlightened the mind of a single man.}}
 
{{Q|Цитата = Провозглашая объединение народов, вы на самом деле хотите, чтобы они все, как один, переняли бы ваши обыкновения и утратили свои. Если, положим, араб-бедуин не умеет читать, то вы пошлете в Аравию миссионера или преподавателя; надо, мол, научить его грамоте; кто из вас, однако же, скажет: «А учитель-то наш не умеет ездить на верблюде; наймем-ка бедуина, пусть он его поучит?» Вы говорите, цивилизация ваша откроет простор всем дарованиям. Так ли это? Вы действительно полагаете, будто эскимосы научатся избирать местные советы, а вы тем временем научитесь гарпунить моржей?|Комментарий = |Автор = |Оригинал = When you say you want all peoples to unite, you really mean that you want all peoples to unite to learn the tricks of your people. If the Bedouin Arab does not know how to read, some English missionary or schoolmaster must be sent to teach him to read, but no one ever says, 'This schoolmaster does not know how to ride on a camel; let us pay a Bedouin to teach him.' You say your civilization will include all talents. Will it? Do you really mean to say that at the moment when the Esquimaux has learnt to vote for a County Council, you will have learnt to spear a walrus? }}
 
{{Q|Цитата = Множество умных людей, подобно вам, уповали на цивилизацию: множество умных вавилонян, умных египтян и умнейших римлян на закате Римской империи. Мы живем на обломках погибших цивилизаций: не могли бы вы сказать, что такого особенно бессмертного в вашей теперешней?|Комментарий = |Автор = |Оригинал = Many clever men like you have trusted to civilization. Many clever Babylonians, many clever Egyptians, many clever men at the end of Rome. Can you tell me, in a world that is flagrant with the failures of civilization, what there is particularly immortal about yours?}}
{{Q|Цитата = Он уяснил то, что всем романтикам давно известно: что приключения случаются не в солнечные дни, а во дни серые. Напряги монотонную струну до отказа, и она порвется так звучно, будто зазвучала песня.|Комментарий = |Автор = |Оригинал = He discovered the fact that all romantics know...that adventures happen on dull days, and not on sunny ones. When the chord of monotony is stretched most tight, then it breaks with a sound like song.}}
 
{{Q|Цитата = Прежние республиканцы-[[идеал]]исты, бывало, основывали демократию, полагая, будто все люди одинаково умны. Однако же уверяю вас: прочная и здравая демократия базируется на том, что все люди — одинаковые болваны.|Комментарий = |Автор = |Оригинал = The old idealistic republicans used to found democracy on the idea that all men were equally intelligent. Believe me, the sane and enduring democracy is founded on the fact that all men are equally idiotic.}}
{{Q|Цитата = Провозглашая объединение народов, вы на самом деле хотите, чтобы они все, как один, переняли бы ваши обыкновения и утратили свои. Если, положим, араб-бедуин не умеет читать, то вы пошлете в Аравию миссионера или преподавателя; надо, мол, научить его грамоте; кто из вас, однако же, скажет: «А учитель-то наш не умеет ездить на верблюде; наймем-ка бедуина, пусть он его поучит?» Вы говорите, цивилизация ваша откроет простор всем дарованиям. Так ли это? Вы действительно полагаете, будто эскимосы научатся избирать местные советы, а вы тем временем научитесь гарпунить моржей?|Комментарий = |Автор = |Оригинал = When you say you want all peoples to unite, you really mean that you want all peoples to unite to learn the tricks of your people. If the Bedouin Arab does not know how to read, some English missionary or schoolmaster must be sent to teach him to read, but no one ever says, 'This schoolmaster does not know how to ride on a camel; let us pay a Bedouin to teach him.' You say your civilization will include all talents. Will it? Do you really mean to say that at the moment when the Esquimaux has learnt to vote for a County Council, you will have learnt to spear a walrus? }}
 
{{Q|Цитата = Род людской, а к нему относится немалая толика моих читателей, от века привержен детским играм и вовек не оставит их, сердись не сердись те немногие, кому почему-либо удалось повзрослеть.|Комментарий = [//wikilivres.ru/Наполеон_Ноттингхилльский_(Честертон)/Книга_1/Глава_1 Книга 1, Глава 1]|Автор = |Оригинал = THE human race, to which so many of my readers belong, has been playing at children's games from the beginning, and will probably do it till the end, which is a nuisance for the few people who grow up.}}
{{Q|Цитата = — Тот человек опаснее всех,— заметил старик, не шелохнувшись,— у кого на уме одно, и только одно. Я и сам был когда-то опасен.|Комментарий = |Автор = |Оригинал = "Every man is dangerous," said the old man, without moving, "who cares only for one thing. I was once dangerous myself."}}
{{Q|Цитата = Сам по себе всякий человек с виду существо, пожалуй что, и разумное: и ест, и спит, и планы строит. А взять человечество? Оно изменчивое и загадочное, привередливое и очаровательное. Словом, люди — большей частью мужчины, но Человек есть женщина.|Комментарий = |Автор = |Оригинал = Individually, men may present a more or less rational appearance, eating, sleeping, and scheming. But humanity as a whole is changeful, mystical, fickle, delightful. Men are men, but Man is a woman.}}
 
{{Q|Цитата = Сумасшедшие — народ серьезный; они и с ума-то сходят за недостатком юмора.|Комментарий = [//wikilivres.ru/Наполеон_Ноттингхилльский_(Честертон)/Книга_2/Глава_1 Книга 2, Глава 1]|Автор = |Оригинал = Madmen are always serious; they go mad from lack of humour. }}
 
{{Q|Цитата = Вы, кажется, полагаете, что забавнее всего чинно держаться на улицах и на торжественных обедах, а у себя дома, возле камина (вы правы — камин мне по средствам) смешить гостей до упаду. Но так все и делают. Возьмите любого — на людях серьезен, а на дому — [[юмор]]ист. Чувство юмора подсказывает мне, что надо бы наоборот, что надо быть шутом на людях и степенным на дому.|Комментарий = |Автор = |Оригинал = You appear to think that it would be amusing to be dignified in the banquet hall and in the street, and at my own fireside (I could procure a fireside) to keep the company in a roar. But that is what every one does. Every one is grave in public, and funny in private. My sense of humour suggests the reversal of this; it suggests that one should be funny in public, and solemn in private.}}
 
{{Q|Цитата = Если поверить вашим богатым друзьям, будто ни Бога, ни богов нет, будто над нами пустые небеса, так за что же тогда драться, как не за то место на земле, где человек сперва побывал в Эдеме детства, а потом — совсем недолго — в райских кущах первой любви? Если нет более ни храмов, ни Священного писания, то что же и свято, кроме собственной юности?|Комментарий = [//wikilivres.ru/Наполеон_Ноттингхилльский_(Честертон)/Книга_2/Глава_3 Книга 2, Глава 3]|Автор = |Оригинал = If, as your rich friends say, there are no gods, and the skies are dark above us, what should a man fight for, but the place where he had the Eden of childhood and the short heaven of first love? If no temples and no scriptures are sacred, what is sacred if a man's own youth is not sacred?}}
 
{{Q|Цитата = Еще мальчишкой Адам Уэйн проникся к убогим улочкам Ноттинг-Хилла тем же древним благоговением, каким были проникнуты жители Афин или Иерусалима. Он изведал тайну этого чувства, тайну, из-за которой так странно звучат на наш слух старинные народные песни. Он знал, что истинного патриотизма куда больше в скорбных и заунывных песнях, чем в победных маршах. Он знал, что половина обаяния народных исторических песен — в именах собственных. И знал, наконец, главнейшую психическую особенность патриотизма, такую же непременную, как стыдливость, отличающую всех влюбленных: знал, что патриот никогда, ни при каких обстоятельствах не хвастает огромностью своей страны, но ни за что не упустит случая похвастать тем, какая она маленькая.|Комментарий = |Автор = |Оригинал = Adam Wayne, as a boy, had for his dull streets in Notting Hill the ultimate and ancient sentiment that went out to Athens or Jerusalem. He knew the secret of the passion, those secrets which make real old national songs sound so strange to our civilization. He knew that real patriotism tends to sing about sorrows and forlorn hopes much more than about victory. He knew that in proper names themselves is half the poetry of all national poems. Above all, he knew the supreme psychological fact about patriotism, as certain in connection with it as that a fine shame comes to all lovers, the fact that the patriot never under any circumstances boasts of the largeness of his country, but always, and of necessity, boasts of the smallness of it.}}
 
=== [[wikilivres:Человек, который был Четвергом (Честертон)|Человек, который был Четвергом (1908)]] ===
Анонимный участник